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Student Instructor

Korean War in 1950

Students at a Model Diplomacy simulation.
Students at a Model Diplomacy simulation.
Students at a Model Diplomacy simulation.

3.1 Role 

Welcome to your role as a participant in the UN Security Council (UNSC)! You should have received an email with your role assignment, but if you did not, you can view your assignment by clicking on the “My Simulations” tab on your account page. At this point, you should have reviewed essential background information about the UN Security Council, read the case, watched the accompanying videos, and perused some of the additional reading. Whether you have been assigned a specific role as an individual or part of a group, we suggest you read the case once again to identify material that is particularly relevant to your role or that requires further investigation. After that, you will conduct independent research as you write your draft resolution clauses and prepare for the role-play.

There are three subsections that follow. Research and Preparation (3.2) will aid your research for the draft resolution clauses and provide additional reading to guide your research; the Guide to the Draft Resolutions (3.3) provides information about UN resolutions and an example; and the Guide to the Role-Play (3.4) provides more information on the in-class role-play.

Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.GO TO SECTION 4.1

Case Roles

There are five permanent UN Security Council members, known as the P5: the United States, China, France, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom (in 1950, the Chinese seat was held by the Republic of China, commonly known as Taiwan). Permanent members wield veto power, meaning they can block a resolution simply by voting “no.” P5 representatives are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government, using a veto when necessary.

A P5 country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • Are there any policy options that you absolutely do not support? If this policy option came to a vote, would you use a veto? Why or why not?
  • How has your country’s veto usage changed over time? What issues does your country tend to use a veto on?
  • Have other permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council, particularly those by your country. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

There are five permanent UN Security Council members, known as the P5: the United States, China, France, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom (in 1950, the Chinese seat was held by the Republic of China, commonly known as Taiwan). Permanent members wield veto power, meaning they can block a resolution simply by voting “no.” P5 representatives are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government, using a veto when necessary.

A P5 country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • Are there any policy options that you absolutely do not support? If this policy option came to a vote, would you use a veto? Why or why not?
  • How has your country’s veto usage changed over time? What issues does your country tend to use a veto on?
  • Have other permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council, particularly those by your country. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

There are five permanent UN Security Council members, known as the P5: the United States, China, France, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom (in 1950, the Chinese seat was held by the Republic of China, commonly known as Taiwan). Permanent members wield veto power, meaning they can block a resolution simply by voting “no.” P5 representatives are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government, using a veto when necessary.

A P5 country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Presidency of the council rotates on a monthly basis in the alphabetical order of country names in English. In September 1950, The United Kingdom held the presidency of the UN Security Council. When a member state holds the presidency, its representative simultaneously serves as president of the council—chairing and scheduling meetings and approving and distributing meeting agendas—and of the representative of the state. To that end, representatives acting as president should always state whether they are acting in their national capacity before making a statement.

In addition to fulfilling his or her goals as member state representative, the UN Security Council president’s goals are to

  • facilitate the decisionmaking process by keeping the discussion on track and guiding it toward concrete policy options, and
  • communicate the goals and policies of the UN Security Council to the press and other international audiences.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • Are there any policy options that you absolutely do not support? If this policy option came to a vote, would you use a veto? Why or why not?
  • How has your country’s veto usage changed over time? What issues does your country tend to use a veto on?
  • Have other permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council, particularly those by your country. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

There are five permanent UN Security Council members, known as the P5: the United States, China, France, Russia, and the United Kingdom. Permanent members wield veto power, meaning they can block a resolution simply by voting “no.” P5 representatives are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government, using a veto when necessary.

A P5 country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • Are there any policy options that you absolutely do not support? If this policy option came to a vote, would you use a veto? Why or why not?
  • How has your country’s veto usage changed over time? What issues does your country tend to use a veto on?
  • Have other permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council, particularly those by your country. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

There are five permanent UN Security Council members, known as the P5: the United States, China, France, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom (in 1950, the Chinese seat was held by the Republic of China, commonly known as Taiwan). Permanent members wield veto power, meaning they can block a resolution simply by voting “no.” P5 representatives are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government, using a veto when necessary.

A P5 country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China (if applicable)? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • Are there any policy options that you absolutely do not support? If this policy option came to a vote, would you use a veto? Why or why not?
  • How has your country’s veto usage changed over time? What issues does your country tend to use a veto on?
  • Have other permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council, particularly those by your country. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

Six nonpermanent members are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve two-year terms. The representatives of nonpermanent members are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government. Because nonpermanent members are elected to represent one of five regional groups, they are often expected, but not required, to consult with other nonpermanent members of their regional group to ensure they are putting forward a unified policy.

A nonpermanent member country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

Six nonpermanent members are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve two-year terms. The representatives of nonpermanent members are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government. Because nonpermanent members are elected to represent one of five regional groups, they are often expected, but not required, to consult with other nonpermanent members of their regional group to ensure they are putting forward a unified policy.

A nonpermanent member country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

Six nonpermanent members are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve two-year terms. The representatives of nonpermanent members are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government. Because nonpermanent members are elected to represent one of five regional groups, they are often expected, but not required, to consult with other nonpermanent members of their regional group to ensure they are putting forward a unified policy.

A nonpermanent member country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

Six nonpermanent members are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve two-year terms. The representatives of nonpermanent members are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government. Because nonpermanent members are elected to represent one of five regional groups, they are often expected, but not required, to consult with other nonpermanent members of their regional group to ensure they are putting forward a unified policy.

A nonpermanent member country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

Six nonpermanent members are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve two-year terms. The representatives of nonpermanent members are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government. Because nonpermanent members are elected to represent one of five regional groups, they are often expected, but not required, to consult with other nonpermanent members of their regional group to ensure they are putting forward a unified policy.

A nonpermanent member country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

Six nonpermanent members are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve two-year terms. The representatives of nonpermanent members are responsible for attending meetings, presenting motions, making statements, and voting on behalf of their government. Because nonpermanent members are elected to represent one of five regional groups, they are often expected, but not required, to consult with other nonpermanent members of their regional group to ensure they are putting forward a unified policy.

A nonpermanent member country’s representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by drafting and negotiating Security Council documents;
  • liaise and consult with other member states, nonmember states, UN staff, and other interested parties on behalf of their government; and
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of their country.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

As the United Nations’ chief administrative officer, the secretary-general attends sessions of UN bodies, consults with world leaders and other interested parties, issues reports on the work of the United Nations, and acts as a spokesperson for the organization. The secretary-general is the face of the UN system. Within the UN Security Council, the secretary-general represents the UN Secretariat and assists the council president by preparing agendas for meetings, maintaining the speakers list, and overseeing routine tasks such as the distribution of documents and the logistics for council meetings.

The secretary-general’s goals are to

  • promote the maintenance of international peace and security by bringing relevant matters to the attention of the UN Security Council,
  • build trust as an honest broker among the participants, and
  • represent the interests of the UN Secretariat at the UN Security Council by making statements and setting meeting agendas.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten global security?
  • What role should the United Nations play in resolving this crisis? What are the benefits and costs of unilateral versus multilateral responses?  
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of UN Security Council member states and other organizations that have a stake in the Korean peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Review public comments by UN secretaries-general on the subject. The UN maintains a full collection of speeches made by UN officials, which can be filtered by topic, region, year, and more.
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.
  • Familiarize yourself with the actions and stances of UN Security Council member states on the issue by examining their past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.

In certain cases, nonmember states or nonmember observers of the United Nations are invited to take part in Security Council deliberations. Nonmember states and observers may participate in UN Security Council debate, but they may not vote. Because they are often invited because of either their proximity to or expertise on the issue, representatives of nonmember states or observers may be asked to answer questions and provide background information to the council.

A nonmember state or observer representative’s goals are to

  • promote their government’s interests and values at the United Nations, specifically by making speeches and asking questions; and
  • when applicable, provide complete, accurate, and up-to-date information or insight on the situation under discussion.

Issues for Consideration:

  • How does the situation presented in this case threaten your country’s national security? How does it threaten international security?
  • What national interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should they influence your country’s response?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between your country and the United States? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What is the nature of the relationships between your country and both the Soviet Union and Communist China? How does this inform potential national action in this case?
  • What your country’s relationship with other parties relevant to this case? How does this affect your response to the proposed policy options?  
  • Have permanent members used vetoes on votes regarding this issue? What kind of policy options or resolutions have they vetoed? How should this influence your negotiation strategy within the Council?
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the UN Security Council?
  • What are the trade-offs raised by the potential policy options in this case?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in the Korean Peninsula? How, if at all, might they affect the current situation?

 

Research Leads:

Note: since this is a historical role-play, you should only use and reference documents and information from before the fall of 1950.

  • Research essential facts about your country, including its political system and government, economy, culture, and physical geography. The CIA World Factbook and BBC country profiles are good places to start. 
  • Identify and understand your country’s foreign policy and stance on the issue. The websites for your country’s permanent mission to the United Nations or foreign ministry are good sources of information of this nature.
  • Familiarize yourself with your country’s actions at the United Nations by examining its past statements and voting history in various UN bodies. Good places to start are UN Member States on the Record, which keeps transcripts of all statements made by UN member states, and UNBISnet, which keeps voting records for all UN resolutions.
  • Research the history of vetoes at the UN Security Council. The UN maintains a list of vetoes at the UN Security Council; pay close attention to vetoes regarding the issue at hand. 
  • Familiarize yourself with past international action on the subject. Past treaties, conventions and UN resolutions are important precedents for further action on the issue, and are often cited in Security Council resolutions and presidential statements. The United Nations keeps a comprehensive database of Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and reports, as well as international treaties and other documents.

This is a customized role created by the instructor. Please see your instructor for your role description.

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