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Student Instructor

Public Health and Trade: E‑cigarette Dispute

Students at a Model Diplomacy simulation.
Students at a Model Diplomacy simulation.
Students at a Model Diplomacy simulation.

3.1 Role

Welcome to your role as a participant in the National Security Council (NSC)! You can view your assignment by clicking on the “My Simulations” tab on your account page. You can learn about your role by reading the information provided in your case role, which can be found at the bottom of this page. Your case role description contains three parts: a description of your role, issues for consideration, and research leads. The role description details the position you will portray in the role-play. The issues for consideration will guide your thinking and assist you in approaching the case from the perspective of your assigned role. Research leads provide suggested materials and topics for further research specifically relevant to your assigned role. Review this information thoroughly and often, as your objectives and strategy in the position memo and role-play will be shaped by the institutional perspective of the role you have been assigned (unless you are playing a general advisor). If you have been assigned a customized role, please refer to guidelines set by your instructor.

Whether you have been assigned a specific role as an individual or part of a group, or as a general advisor to the president, we suggest you re-read the decision point and policy options to identify actions that are particularly relevant to the department or agency that you represent that may require further investigation. There are three subsections that follow. Research and Preparation (3.2) will aid your research for the position memo and provide additional reading to guide your research; the Guide to the Memorandum (3.3) provides information about position memos and an example; and the Guide to the Role-Play (3.4) provides more information on the role-play. After you finish the role-play and subsequent debrief, you will have an opportunity to share your personal thoughts and recommendations on this case in a policy review memo (Section 4, Wrap-up).

All case roles are listed below.

Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.GO TO SECTION 4.1

Case Roles

Description of Role:

The president is the head of state and commander in chief of the U.S. Armed Forces. They preside over National Security Council (NSC) meetings and listens to the advice and information presented by others. The president is not expected to be an expert on any single subject, but instead draws on the expertise of the NSC to analyze options and choose what they feel is the best policy to advance U.S. interests.

The president’s goals are to

  • select one or more policy options after considering the opinions and recommendations of NSC members; and
  • balance and promote U.S. interests, with an eye toward both immediate goals and long-term foreign policy strategy.

 

Issues for Consideration:

These can be used to frame the role-play and encourage debate among fellow NSC members.   

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What negotiations or other matters involving trade and investment are currently on the agenda between the United States and Guatemala? How could this dispute affect them? 
  • What past examples, if any, exist of the U.S. policy options presented in this case? How could these examples inform the U.S. response to the dispute? 

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The vice president must be ready at a moment’s notice to assume the presidency if the commander in chief is unable to perform their duties. Vice presidents can play a relatively active role on the National Security Council (NSC), serving as a general advisor and freely advocating their own positions during meetings. In particular, the president may ask the vice president to serve as an independent voice, untethered to any of the agencies represented by other NSC participants. The president may also ask about the interaction between the issue at hand and the domestic political situation, including in Congress.

The vice president’s goals are to

  • provide advice to the president on any topic, including those overlooked by other NSC participants; and
  • understand the range of views in Congress and work to build congressional and public support for the president’s chosen approach.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • How can the president best articulate a decision and communicate it to the American people and the world? 
  • How, if at all, would the White House need to work with Congress to execute any of the proposed policy options in this case? How could varying congressional attitudes influence U.S. action in this dispute? 
  • What obligations, if any, does the United States have under U.S. or international law to combat the rise of noncommunicable diseases? What effect could they have on U.S. action in this case?
  • In what ways do rising rates of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) affect U.S. national security and economic growth? What interest or responsibility does the United States have in addressing NCDs globally? 

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The national security advisor (NSA) has a special role in crisis management, serving as the “honest broker” for the national security policy process. Although the president makes final decisions, the NSA is responsible for ensuring that they have all the necessary information, that a full range of viable policy options has been articulated, that the prospects for success and failure have been identified, that any legal issues have been addressed, and that all members of the National Security Council (NSC) have had the opportunity to contribute.

The national security advisor’s goals are to

  • facilitate the president’s consideration of issues by keeping the NSC discussion on track and guiding it toward concrete policy options; and
  • build trust as an honest broker among the other NSC participants.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What are the most important factors for the president to balance when making a decision? What types of analysis would be most useful for other members of the NSC to present?
  • What negotiations or other matters involving trade and investment are currently on the agenda between the United States and Guatemala? How could this dispute affect them? 
  • What obligations, if any, does the United States have under U.S. or international law to combat the rise of noncommunicable diseases? What effect could they have on U.S. action in this case?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The chief of staff oversees the Executive Office of the President, which provides the president with support to govern effectively. This post has traditionally been home to many of the president’s closest advisors. In National Security Council (NSC) meetings, the chief of staff ensures that the president has the necessary analysis on the full range of factors relevant to the case, including the U.S. political situation. They also guide the process of implementing and communicating presidential decisions.

The chief of staff’s goals are to

  • highlight the domestic implications of U.S. foreign policy choices; and
  • develop strategies to carry out the president’s policy and communicate it to U.S. and international audiences.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • How can the president best articulate a decision and communicate it to the American people and the world? 
  • How, if at all, would the White House need to work with Congress to execute any of the proposed policy options in this case? How could varying congressional attitudes influence U.S. action in this dispute? 
  • What are the attitudes of Congress and the American public on tobacco and the trade of tobacco products? What views have businesses and business associations expressed on the issue? How should these attitudes and opinions shape U.S. policy?
  • What are the most important factors for the president to balance when making a decision? What types of analysis would be most useful for other members of the NSC to present?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The Department of State maintains the U.S. diplomatic presence around the world, conducting foreign relations and using an on-the-ground perspective to generate country-specific knowledge. As head of the department, the secretary draws on this knowledge to present an authoritative view of the United States’ bilateral relationships, the relationships between foreign countries, and the behavior and interests of foreign governments.

The secretary of state’s goals are to 

  • serve as the president’s principal foreign policy advisor; and 
  • analyze how policy options will affect the interests, reputation, and relationships of the United States. 

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What obligations, if any, does the United States have under U.S. or international law to combat the rise of noncommunicable diseases? What effect could they have on U.S. action in this case?
  • What international agreements exist regarding the global trade of tobacco products? What, if any, obligations do they place on the United States that could inform U.S. action in this case?
  • What negotiations or other matters involving trade and investment are currently on the agenda between the United States and Guatemala? How could this dispute affect them? 

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The secretary of defense is the principal defense policy advisor to the president, under whose direction they exercise authority over the Department of Defense. In National Security Council (NSC) meetings, the secretary analyzes the security situation in the relevant region and explains the likely implications of U.S. military involvement, both for the immediate crisis and for the United States’ overall strategic position.

The secretary of defense’s goals are to

  • understand the options for and feasibility of any military action, as well as its possible outcomes; and
  • identify ways to prevent the deterioration of a crisis to the point where it mandates U.S. military intervention.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR)? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of CAFTA-DR? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What past examples, if any, exist of the U.S. policy options presented in this case? How can these examples inform the U.S. response to the dispute? 

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The Department of the Treasury carries out policy on issues related to the U.S. and global economies and financial systems. The secretary of the treasury, as head of this department, serves as one of the president’s chief economic advisors. In National Security Council (NSC) meetings, they analyze the economic dimensions of foreign policy issues and weighs the potential impact of policy options on U.S. economic concerns, including growth, trade and investment, and the position of the U.S. dollar.

The secretary of the treasury’s goals are to

  • serve as a senior presidential advisor on economic policy; and
  • determine how foreign policy options might affect the U.S. economy and financial system, the global economy, and economic relations between the United States and others.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? What are the United States’ financial ties to Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What negotiations or other matters involving trade and investment are currently on the agenda between the United States and Guatemala? How could this dispute affect them? 
  • What role does the trade of tobacco products play in the U.S. economy? What are the economic risks posed by restrictions on that trade?
  • How is the Doggett Amendment relevant in this case? How has the U.S. government treated the international trade of e-cigarette products in the past?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

 

The attorney general is the head of the Department of Justice and the chief lawyer of the U.S. government. The department represents the United States in legal matters, including by prosecuting violations of federal law. In National Security Council (NSC) meetings, the attorney general gives the president advice and opinions on the legal aspects of policies under consideration.

The attorney general’s goals are to

  • consider the legal elements and implications of U.S. foreign policy options; and
  • ensure that any policies decided by the NSC are in compliance with domestic and international law. 

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What are the legal considerations of pressuring Guatemala to lift its restrictions on e-cigarettes in this case? What are the legal considerations of blocking the export of e-cigarettes to Guatemala?
  • How is the Doggett Amendment relevant in this case? How has the U.S. government treated the international trade of e-cigarette products in the past?
  • What kind of legitimate backing, such as domestic legislation, legal mechanisms within the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement, or World Trade Organization agreements, could be useful or necessary for any U.S. action in this case? 
  • What obligations, if any, does the United States have under U.S. or international law to combat the rise of noncommunicable diseases? What effect could they have on U.S. action in this case?
  • What international agreements exist regarding the global trade of tobacco products? What, if any, obligations do they place on the United States that could inform U.S. action in this case?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The U.S. intelligence community consists of seventeen agencies and organizations that gather and analyze intelligence to help policymakers formulate and implement U.S. foreign policy. The director of national intelligence oversees this network of agencies. They focus on providing the latest relevant information to National Security Council (NSC) members and articulating the capabilities and interests of the intelligence community.

The director of national intelligence’s goals are to

  • provide complete, accurate, and up-to-date information to the NSC on the situation under discussion; and
  • serve as the principal advisor to the president and the NSC on intelligence matters.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What are the most important factors for the president to balance when making a decision? What types of analysis would be most useful for other members of the NSC to present?

 

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The role of the U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations (UN) is to advance U.S. foreign policy interests in the bodies and forums of the UN system. Reporting to the secretary of state, the permanent representative helps formulate and articulate the U.S. position on all political and security matters under discussion at the UN. At National Security Council (NSC) meetings, they outline policy steps available to the United States at the UN and advises NSC participants on the positions and actions of other UN member states.

The U.S. permanent representative to the UN’s goals are to

  • advise the president and secretary of state on the diplomatic actions the United States can or should take at the UN; and
  • promote the United States’ interests and values at the UN. 

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What has been the role of the United Nations and its component parts in addressing noncommunicable diseases globally? What international treaties or regulations exist that could inform U.S. action in this case?
  • What international agreements exist regarding the global trade of tobacco products? What, if any, obligations do they place on the United States that could inform U.S. action in this case?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) is responsible for overall U.S. policy on trade and investment and for negotiations on these matters with foreign countries. The office is part of the Executive Office of the President. The U.S. trade representative, who leads the office, functions as the president’s main advisor on trade policy and as the lead U.S. negotiator for trade and investment agreements.

The U.S. trade representative’s goals are to

  • advise the president on issues surrounding U.S. trade with and investment in other countries; and
  • improve market access for U.S. businesses and consumers, protect U.S. trade rights, and advance trade policies that facilitate international development. 

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? What are the United States’ financial ties to Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the importance of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement—and Guatemala as a nation—for the U.S., regional, and global economies? What economic effects, if any, would the various policy options in this case have?
  • What negotiations or other matters involving trade and investment are currently on the agenda between the United States and Guatemala? How could this dispute affect them? 
  • What international agreements exist regarding the global trade of tobacco products? What, if any, obligations do they place on the United States that could inform U.S. action in this case?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

 

The Department of Commerce duty is to create the conditions necessary for economic growth and opportunity. The Secretary of Commerce promotes U.S trade and implements trade agreements to ensure fair and reciprocal trade. 

The Secretary of Health and Human Service's goals are to 

  • Advise the president on matters of economic growth and development 
  • ensure that U.S. entrepreneurs and businesses have the tools they need to create jobs and economic opportunity 

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the importance of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement—and Guatemala as a nation—for the U.S., regional, and global economies? What economic effects, if any, would the various policy options in this case have?
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What international agreements exist regarding the global trade of tobacco products? What, if any, obligations do they place on the United States that could inform U.S. action in this case?
  • What are the attitudes of Congress and the American public on tobacco and the trade of tobacco products? What views have businesses and business associations expressed on the issue? How should these attitudes and opinions shape U.S. policy?

Research Leads:

Description of Role:

Established in 1946 in Atlanta, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the leading health agency in the United States. Its responsibilities include monitoring health threats, controlling disease outbreaks, delivering life-saving medicine, and ensuring that food and water are safe. The agency works with local and state health officials to coordinate disease monitoring and control efforts. It also works internationally with organizations such as the World Health Organization to address global health threats and contain disease outbreaks before they can reach the United States.

The Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s goals are to

  • advise the president on issues involving public health, disease control, and the CDC’s efforts to advance related objectives; and
  • describe the potential role and contributions of the CDC, as part of the potential U.S. policy response.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • In what ways do rising rates of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) affect U.S. national security and economic growth? What interest or responsibility does the United States have in addressing NCDs globally? 
  • What is the role of health organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in addressing NCDs? 
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What obligations, if any, does the United States have under U.S. or international law to combat the rise of noncommunicable diseases? What effect could they have on U.S. action in this case?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The Department of Health and Human Services is the U.S. government’s principal agency for protecting the health of Americans by providing essential health services. The Secretary of Health and Human Services, in addition to administering the Department of Health and Human Services, oversees the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), oversees the Native American Health Services and manages the Center for Disease Control (CDC).  

The Secretary of Health and Human Service's goals are to 

  • ​​advise the president on public health, medicine, and social services 
  • develop strategies to promote the health and wellbeing of Americans and to provide Americans with essential human services 

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • In what ways do rising rates of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) affect U.S. national security and economic growth? What interest or responsibility does the United States have in addressing NCDs globally? 
  • What is the role of health organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in addressing NCDs? 
  • What obligations, if any, does the United States have under U.S. or international law to combat the rise of noncommunicable diseases? What effect could they have on U.S. action in this case?
  • What international agreements exist regarding the global trade of tobacco products? What, if any, obligations do they place on the United States that could inform U.S. action in this case?

Research Leads: 

Description of Role:

The general advisor offers analysis and recommendations that are unconstrained by the interests of any department or agency. They are tasked with providing a comprehensive assessment of the situation at hand and ideas for policy options that serve U.S. interests.

The general advisor’s goals are to

  • understand the breadth of the issue and outline its stakes for the United States; and
  • advise the president on the range of policy options proposed by all NSC members.

 

Issues for Consideration:

  • How, if at all, does the situation in Guatemala as presented in this case threaten U.S. national security? 
  • What U.S. interests are at stake in this crisis? How should they be prioritized? How should these various interests influence a U.S. response? 
  • What are the costs, benefits, and risks that accompany each policy option open to the United States? What would happen if the United States simply ignored the issue? 
  • What are the trade-offs raised by various policy options in this case? 
  • What is the nature of the U.S.-Guatemala relationship? How does the United States typically interact with Guatemala, and how does this inform U.S. action in this case? 
  • What is the U.S. relationship with other parties relevant to this case, especially other members of the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement? How does this affect the proposed U.S. policy options?  
  • What are the positions and interests of other countries and organizations that have a stake in global public health initiatives and efforts to combat noncommunicable diseases? How, if at all, could they help resolve, exacerbate, or otherwise shape the current situation? 
  • What negotiations or other matters involving trade and investment are currently on the agenda between the United States and Guatemala? How could this dispute affect them? 
  • What past examples, if any, exist of the U.S. policy options presented in this case? How can these examples inform the U.S. response to the dispute? 

Research Leads: 

This is a customized role created by the instructor. Please see your instructor for your role description.

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